After reading this review of a Theaster Gates show at Regan Projects, in L.A., I hurried to see the show before it closed. Inspired by sociologist and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois, Gates created artistic interpretations of statistical graphics that Du Bois had produced for an exhibition in Paris in 1900. Coincidentally, I had just heard about these graphics the previous week at the Data Science Education Technology conference while evesdropping on a conversation Andy Zieffler was having with someone else.

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The ASA’s most recent curriculum guidelines emphasize the increasing importance of data science, real applications, model diversity, and communication / teamwork in undergraduate education. In an effort to highlight recent efforts inspired by these guidelines, I organized a JSM session titled Doing more with data in and outside the undergraduate classroom. This session featured talks on recent curricular and extra-curricular efforts in this vein, with a particular emphasis on challenging students with real and complex data and data analysis.

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Ten years after Ioannidis alleged that most scientific findings are false, reproducibility – or lack thereof – has become a full-blown crisis in science. Flagship journals like Nature and Science have published hand-wringing editorials and revised their policies in the hopes of heightening standards of reproducibility. In the statistical and data sciences, the barriers towards reproducibility are far lower, given that our analysis can usually be digitally encoded (e.g., scripts, algorithms, data files, etc.

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My JSM 2016 itinerary

JSM 2016 is almost here. I just spent an hour going through the (very) lengthy program. I think that was time well spent, though some might argue I should have been working on my talk instead… Here is what my itinerary looks like as of today. If you know of a session that you think I might be interested in that I missed, please let me know! And if you go to any one of these sessions and not see me there, it means I got distracted by something else (or something close by).

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Last year I was awarded a Project TIER (Teaching Integrity in Empirical Research) fellowship, and last week my work on the fellowship wrapped up with a meeting with the project leads, other fellows from last year, as well as new fellows for the next year. In a nutshell Project TIER focuses on reproducibility. Here is a brief summary of the project’s focus from their website: For a number of years, we have been developing a protocol for comprehensively documenting all the steps of data management and analysis that go into an empirical research paper.

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Are you looking for a way to celebrate World Statistics Day? I know you are. And I can’t think of a better way than supporting the African Data Initiative (ADI). I’m proud to have met some of the statisticians, statisticis educators and researchers who are leading this initative at an International Association of Statistics Educators Roundtable workshop in Cebu, The Phillipines, in 2012. You can read about Roger and David’s Stern’s projects in Kenya here in the journal Technology Innovations in Statistics Education.

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Somehow almost an entire academic year went by without a blog post, I must have been busy… It’s time to get back in the saddle! (I’m using the classical definition of this idiom here, “doing something you stopped doing for a period of time”, not the urban dictionary definition, “when you are back to doing what you do best”, as I really don’t think writing blog posts are what I do best…)

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Citizen Statistician

Learning to swim in the data deluge