I’m a bit late in posting this, but travel delays post-JSM left me weary, so I’m just getting around to it. Better late than never? Wednesday at JSM featured an invited statistics education session on Modernizing the Undergraduate Statistics Curriculum. This session featured two types of speakers: those who are currently involved in undergraduate education and those who are on the receiving end of graduating majors. The speakers involved in undergraduate education presented on their recent efforts for modernizing the undergraduate statistics curriculum to provide the essential computational and problem solving skills expected from today’s modern statistician while also providing a firm grounding in theory and methods.

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Tuesday morning, bright an early at 8:30am, was our session titled “Novel Approaches to First Statistics / Data Science Course”. For some students the first course in statistics may be the only quantitative reasoning course they take in college. For others, it is the first of many in a statistics major curriculum. The content of this course depends on which audience the course is aimed at as well as its place in the curriculum.

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My JSM 2017 itinerary

JSM 2017 is almost here. I just landed in Maryland, and I finally managed to finish combing through the entire program. What a packed schedule! I like writing an itinerary post each year, mainly so I can come back to it during and after the event. I obviously won’t make it to all sessions listed for each time slot below, but my decision for which one(s) to attend during any time period will likely depend on proximity to previous session, and potentially also proximity to childcare area.

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Structuring Data in Middle School

Of the many provocative and exciting discussions at this year’s Statistics Research Teaching and Learning conference in Rotarua, NZ, one that has stuck in my mind is from Lucia Zapata-Cardona, from the Universidad de Antioquia in Columbia. Lucia discussed data from her classroom observations of a teacher at a middle school (ages 12-13) in a “Northwest Columbian city”. The class was exciting for many reasons, but the reason that I want to write about it here is because of the fact that the teacher had the students structure and store their own data.

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One of the many nice things about summer is the time and space it allows for blogging. And, after a very stimulating SRTL conference (Statistics Reasoning, Teaching and Learning) in Rotorua, New Zealand, there’s lots to blog about. Let’s begin with a provocative posting by fellow SRTL-er Tim Erickson at his excellent blog A Best Case Scenario. I’ve known Tim for quite awhile, and have enjoyed many interesting and challenging discussions.

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StatPREP Workshops

This last weekend I helped Danny Kaplan and Kathryn Kozak (Coconino Community College) put on a StatPREP workshop. We were also joined by Amelia McNamara (Smith College) and Joe Roith (St. Catherine’s University). The idea behind StatPREP is to work directly with college-level instructors, through online and in community-based workshops, to develop the understanding and skills needed to work and teach with modern data. Danny Kaplan ponders at #StatPREP One of the most interesting aspects of these workshops were the tutorials and exercises that the participants worked on.

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USCOTS 2017

Citizen Statistician’s very own Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel gave one of the keynote addresses at USCOTS 2017. The abstract for her talk, Teaching Data Science and Statistical Computation to Undergraduates, is given below. What draws students to statistics? For some, the answer is mathematics, and for those a course in probability theory might be an attractive entry point. For others, their first exposure to statistics might be an applied introductory statistics course that focuses on methodology.

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Citizen Statistician

Learning to swim in the data deluge