A little over a year ago, we decided to propose a data visualization course at the first-year level. We had been thinking about this for awhile, but never had the time to teach it given the scheduling constraints we had. When one of the other departments on campus was shut down and the faculty merged in with other departments, we felt that the time was ripe to make this proposal.

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We’re discussing data visualization nowadays in my course, and today’s topic was supposed to be mapping. However late last night I realized I was going to run out of time and decided to table hands on mapping exercises till a bit later in the course (after we do some data manipulation as well, which I think will work better). That being said, talking about maps seemed timely, especially with Hurricane Irma developing.

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We’re discussing data visualization nowadays in my course, and today’s topic was supposed to be mapping. However late last night I realized I was going to run out of time and decided to table hands on mapping exercises till a bit later in the course (after we do some data manipulation as well, which I think will work better). That being said, talking about maps seemed timely, especially with Hurricane Irma developing.

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I’m a bit late in posting this, but travel delays post-JSM left me weary, so I’m just getting around to it. Better late than never? Wednesday at JSM featured an invited statistics education session on Modernizing the Undergraduate Statistics Curriculum. This session featured two types of speakers: those who are currently involved in undergraduate education and those who are on the receiving end of graduating majors. The speakers involved in undergraduate education presented on their recent efforts for modernizing the undergraduate statistics curriculum to provide the essential computational and problem solving skills expected from today’s modern statistician while also providing a firm grounding in theory and methods.

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Tuesday morning, bright an early at 8:30am, was our session titled “Novel Approaches to First Statistics / Data Science Course”. For some students the first course in statistics may be the only quantitative reasoning course they take in college. For others, it is the first of many in a statistics major curriculum. The content of this course depends on which audience the course is aimed at as well as its place in the curriculum.

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Structuring Data in Middle School

Of the many provocative and exciting discussions at this year’s Statistics Research Teaching and Learning conference in Rotarua, NZ, one that has stuck in my mind is from Lucia Zapata-Cardona, from the Universidad de Antioquia in Columbia. Lucia discussed data from her classroom observations of a teacher at a middle school (ages 12-13) in a “Northwest Columbian city”. The class was exciting for many reasons, but the reason that I want to write about it here is because of the fact that the teacher had the students structure and store their own data.

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Structuring Data in Middle School

Of the many provocative and exciting discussions at this year’s Statistics Research Teaching and Learning conference in Rotarua, NZ, one that has stuck in my mind is from Lucia Zapata-Cardona, from the Universidad de Antioquia in Columbia. Lucia discussed data from her classroom observations of a teacher at a middle school (ages 12-13) in a “Northwest Columbian city”. The class was exciting for many reasons, but the reason that I want to write about it here is because of the fact that the teacher had the students structure and store their own data.

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Citizen Statistician

Learning to swim in the data deluge